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Saturday, February 23 2019

Contributor: Isekhua Evborokhai

INTRODUCTION

In last week’s study, we looked at the prayer Paul prayed for the saints at Ephesus and consequently us. In the first three chapters of Ephesians, Paul spelt out in glorious detail all that God did for us, freely by His grace; and now in Chapter 4, he brings a call to us to live right, live in unity and to mature in Christ’s body.

  1. VERSE 1: LIVE A LIFE WORTHY OF YOUR CALLING

“So I, the prisoner for the Lord, appeal to you to live a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called [that is, to live a life that exhibits godly character, moral courage, personal integrity, and mature behaviour—a life that expresses gratitude to God for your salvation](AMP)

The AMP version of this scripture spells it out clearly. We are to live a life that exhibits godly character, moral courage, personal integrity, and mature behaviour—a life that expresses gratitude to God for your salvation. When we really understand how much God did for us, we will naturally want to serve and obey Him out of gratitude. Understanding who we are is the foundation of this worthy walk. We don't walk worthy so that God will love us, but because He does love us. It is motivated out of gratitude, not out of a desire to earn merit.

  1. VERSES 2-3: THE CHARACTER OF A WORTHY WALK.

“with all humility [forsaking self-righteousness], and gentleness [maintaining self-control], with patience (longsuffering), bearing with one another in [unselfish] love. 3 Make every effort to keep the oneness of the Spirit in the bond of peace [each individual working together to make the whole successful].” (AMP) Emphasis mine

    • Humility and Gentleness

A worthy walk before God will be marked by lowliness and gentleness, not a pushy desire to defend our own rights and advance our own agenda. Before Christianity, the word lowliness always had a bad association to it. In the minds of many, it still does, but it is a glorious Christian virtue (Philippians 2:1-10). It means that we can be happy and content when we are not in control or steering things our way.

    • Patience, Bearing with One Another

We need this so that the inevitable wrongs that occur between people in God's family will not work against God's purpose of bringing all things together in Jesus - illustrated through His current work in the church. Longsuffering is the spirit that has the power to take revenge, but never does. It is characteristic of a forgiving, generous heart.

    • Making Every Effort to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace:

This humble, forgiving attitude towards each other naturally fulfils this gift of the unity of the Spirit. We must endeavour to keep this unity - we do not create it. God never commands us to create unity among believers. He has created it by His Spirit; our duty is to recognize it and keep it. This is a spiritual unity, not necessarily a structural or denominational unity. It is evident in the quick fellowship possible among Christians of different races, nationalities, languages, and economic classes.

  1. VERSES 4-6: THE DESCRIPTION OF THE UNITY OF THE CHURCH.

“There is one body [of believers] and one Spirit—just as you were called to one hope when called [to salvation]— 5 one Lord, one faith, one baptism, 6 one God and Father of us all who is [sovereign] over all and [working] through all and [living] in all.” (AMP)

    • The Seven Elements that Unite us

We have unity because of what we share in common. There are seven elements unite us; one body [of believers], one Spirit, one hope, one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of us all. Each of these common areas is greater than any potential differences we may have.

Paul urges us to look at the things which unite us, rather than the things that divide us. The early church didn't lack conflict, but they worked hard -- with the apostles' urging -- to preserve, guard, and maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace, focusing on the things they did have in common.

4. VERSES 7:  UNIQUE GIFTINGS

“Yet grace [God’s undeserved favour] was given to each one of us [not indiscriminately, but in different ways] in proportion to the measure of Christ’s [rich and abundant] gift.”

    • Grace was given:

We all have grace given to us according to the measure of Jesus' rich and abundant gift. This is basis for God's distribution of spiritual gifts through His church: grace, the free, unmerited giving of God. No one deserves or has earned spiritual gifts. God works unity through spiritual gifts of leadership in the church.

5. VERSES 8-10 DISPENSING SPIRITUAL GIFTS TO THE CHURCH.

“Therefore, He says: "When He ascended on high, He led captivity captive, and gave gifts to men." (Now this, "He ascended"; what does it mean but that He also first descended into the lower parts of the earth? He who descended is also the One who ascended far above all the heavens, that He might fill all things.)”

Paul begins his discussion of spiritual gifts in verse 8 by using the figure of a military victory procession where the conquering general leads the prisoners of war through the streets of the capital and distributes gifts to his subjects from the booty (See Colossians 2:15). He then quotes Psalm 68:18:

"When he ascended on high, he led captives in his train and gave gifts to men."

Now this, "He ascended"; what does it mean:

In this, Paul demonstrates how the words He ascended in Psalm 68:18 have reference to the resurrection of Jesus, speaking first of His rising from the lower parts of the earth, (1 Peter 3:19 and 4:6); and secondly of His ascension far above all the heavens.

CONCLUSION

The sheer extravagance of God’s marvellous grace; firstly, for our salvation and now for the generosity in dispensing gifts in the body of Christ should endear us to Him stirring our hearts to serve Him out of gratitude and not out of a desire to earn merit. We should in this service focus on the elements that unite us rather than any differences we may have. Because by this we show that we are Christ’s disciples (John 13:35) and ultimately please our Father in heaven.

Posted by: Isekhua Evborokhai AT 06:16 pm   |  Permalink   |  Email
Saturday, February 23 2019

Contributor: Isekhua Evborokhai

INTRODUCTION

In last week’s study, we looked at the prayer Paul prayed for the saints at Ephesus and consequently us. In the first three chapters of Ephesians, Paul spelt out in glorious detail all that God did for us, freely by His grace; and now in Chapter 4, he brings a call to us to live right, live in unity and to mature in Christ’s body.

  1. VERSE 1: LIVE A LIFE WORTHY OF YOUR CALLING

“So I, the prisoner for the Lord, appeal to you to live a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called [that is, to live a life that exhibits godly character, moral courage, personal integrity, and mature behaviour—a life that expresses gratitude to God for your salvation](AMP)

The AMP version of this scripture spells it out clearly. We are to live a life that exhibits godly character, moral courage, personal integrity, and mature behaviour—a life that expresses gratitude to God for your salvation. When we really understand how much God did for us, we will naturally want to serve and obey Him out of gratitude. Understanding who we are is the foundation of this worthy walk. We don't walk worthy so that God will love us, but because He does love us. It is motivated out of gratitude, not out of a desire to earn merit.

  1. VERSES 2-3: THE CHARACTER OF A WORTHY WALK.

“with all humility [forsaking self-righteousness], and gentleness [maintaining self-control], with patience (longsuffering), bearing with one another in [unselfish] love. 3 Make every effort to keep the oneness of the Spirit in the bond of peace [each individual working together to make the whole successful].” (AMP) Emphasis mine

    • Humility and Gentleness

A worthy walk before God will be marked by lowliness and gentleness, not a pushy desire to defend our own rights and advance our own agenda. Before Christianity, the word lowliness always had a bad association to it. In the minds of many, it still does, but it is a glorious Christian virtue (Philippians 2:1-10). It means that we can be happy and content when we are not in control or steering things our way.

    • Patience, Bearing with One Another

We need this so that the inevitable wrongs that occur between people in God's family will not work against God's purpose of bringing all things together in Jesus - illustrated through His current work in the church. Longsuffering is the spirit that has the power to take revenge, but never does. It is characteristic of a forgiving, generous heart.

    • Making Every Effort to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace:

This humble, forgiving attitude towards each other naturally fulfils this gift of the unity of the Spirit. We must endeavour to keep this unity - we do not create it. God never commands us to create unity among believers. He has created it by His Spirit; our duty is to recognize it and keep it. This is a spiritual unity, not necessarily a structural or denominational unity. It is evident in the quick fellowship possible among Christians of different races, nationalities, languages, and economic classes.

  1. VERSES 4-6: THE DESCRIPTION OF THE UNITY OF THE CHURCH.

“There is one body [of believers] and one Spirit—just as you were called to one hope when called [to salvation]— 5 one Lord, one faith, one baptism, 6 one God and Father of us all who is [sovereign] over all and [working] through all and [living] in all.” (AMP)

    • The Seven Elements that Unite us

We have unity because of what we share in common. There are seven elements unite us; one body [of believers], one Spirit, one hope, one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of us all. Each of these common areas is greater than any potential differences we may have.

Paul urges us to look at the things which unite us, rather than the things that divide us. The early church didn't lack conflict, but they worked hard -- with the apostles' urging -- to preserve, guard, and maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace, focusing on the things they did have in common.

4. VERSES 7:  UNIQUE GIFTINGS

“Yet grace [God’s undeserved favour] was given to each one of us [not indiscriminately, but in different ways] in proportion to the measure of Christ’s [rich and abundant] gift.”

    • Grace was given:

We all have grace given to us according to the measure of Jesus' rich and abundant gift. This is basis for God's distribution of spiritual gifts through His church: grace, the free, unmerited giving of God. No one deserves or has earned spiritual gifts. God works unity through spiritual gifts of leadership in the church.

5. VERSES 8-10 DISPENSING SPIRITUAL GIFTS TO THE CHURCH.

“Therefore, He says: "When He ascended on high, He led captivity captive, and gave gifts to men." (Now this, "He ascended"; what does it mean but that He also first descended into the lower parts of the earth? He who descended is also the One who ascended far above all the heavens, that He might fill all things.)”

Paul begins his discussion of spiritual gifts in verse 8 by using the figure of a military victory procession where the conquering general leads the prisoners of war through the streets of the capital and distributes gifts to his subjects from the booty (See Colossians 2:15). He then quotes Psalm 68:18:

"When he ascended on high, he led captives in his train and gave gifts to men."

Now this, "He ascended"; what does it mean:

In this, Paul demonstrates how the words He ascended in Psalm 68:18 have reference to the resurrection of Jesus, speaking first of His rising from the lower parts of the earth, (1 Peter 3:19 and 4:6); and secondly of His ascension far above all the heavens.

CONCLUSION

The sheer extravagance of God’s marvellous grace; firstly, for our salvation and now for the generosity in dispensing gifts in the body of Christ should endear us to Him stirring our hearts to serve Him out of gratitude and not out of a desire to earn merit. We should in this service focus on the elements that unite us rather than any differences we may have. Because by this we show that we are Christ’s disciples (John 13:35) and ultimately please our Father in heaven.

Posted by: Isekhua Evborokhai AT 06:04 pm   |  Permalink   |  Email
Sunday, February 17 2019

Contributor: Isekhua Evborokhai

INTRODUCTION: In last week’s study, we saw God’s marvelous plan for the Gentiles and how Paul; a genuine messenger of Christ fitted into this plan. We saw this plan being fulfilled in the Gentile world to the intent that now the manifold wisdom of God is known by the church. He then encouraged the Ephesians not to lose heart because he, Paul was suffering in chains and prayed this prayer for the saints. Today’s study is a prayer in continuation of his encouragement.

STRENGTHENED THROUGH HIS SPIRIT READ - Ephesians 3:14-16. 

  • Verse 14: “For this cause, I bow my knees to the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ

Following from verses 1-13 where Paul related how God called him to minister to Gentiles Paul bowed in reverence to pray to the Father. He specifically uses the word Father for God. In patriarchal families of that day, the father was the authority figure, a man to be obeyed. 

  • Verse 15: “from whom every family in heaven and on earth is named”

The assignment of names is the privilege of the creator.  In human families, the father and mother name their children.  Naming is essential to the child’s identity.  Not only does our name tell us who we are, but it ties us to our parents, who gave us our name. But the Heavenly Father is the ultimate Creator—the One who created all families, both those on earth (who are still alive) and those in heaven (those who have died).  The Heavenly Father thus has the right to assign names to all families—and to all of creation (Genesis 1:5, 8, 10).

Being named by the Heavenly Father gives us our spiritual identity, and ties us to our Father.

  • Verse 16: “that he would grant you, according to the riches of his glory, that you may be strengthened with power through his Spirit in the inward man”  

Paul prays that God would strengthen these Ephesian Christians “with power (dunamis) through his Spirit in the inward man.” The Greek word dunamis (from which we get our word dynamite) speaks of a special kind of power—the ability to do or to accomplish.  It is an enabling sort of power, because it equips us to do good things while leaving us freedom to exercise that power. It is natural that this power would come through the Holy Spirit—the presence of God with us—God dwelling in our hearts—God guiding and empowering us.

Paul prays that the measure of power accorded the Ephesian Christians and consequently us, might be in accord with “the riches of (God’s) glory.”  What a prayer!  The riches of God’s glory are infinite, so Paul is praying for God to shower us with infinite blessings. 

FILLED WITH ALL THE FULLNESS OF GOD - Read Ephesians 3:17-19. 

  • Verse 17a: “that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith” 

The word dwell here refers to Christ making a home in our hearts and not just that but Him setting up housekeeping in our hearts—Christ making our hearts His dwelling place. The heart refers to the center of one’s being, both physical and spiritual—that which makes the individual person what he or she is—character, intellect, personality, etc.  Paul’s vision is that, having experienced God’s infinite blessings, Christians might harbor Christ’s presence in the innermost parts of their being by faith.

If Christ is to dwell in our hearts, we must receive him in faith.  Christ wants to bless every person, but will not force his way into their hearts.  Faith is the key that unlocks the door.

  • Verse 17b “to the end that you, being rooted and grounded in love” (agape)

As every gardener knows, plants depend on their roots for nurture and sustenance.  The roots might be underground—invisible to the casual observer—but they are absolutely essential to the well-being of the plant. But much also depends on the soil in which the roots are rooted.  If the soil has moisture and nutrients, the roots will extract those and feed the plant—so that the plant can prosper.  However, if the soil contains no moisture or nutrients, the roots will be helpless—unable to support the life of the plant—and the plant will die. But these Christians have no reason to worry about the spiritual soil in which they are rooted.  It is agape—God’s love—the kind of love that a mother showers on her child—the kind of love that focuses on giving rather than getting.

  • Verse 18a: “may be strengthened to comprehend”

Being rooted in and surrounded by God’s love makes it possible for Christians to understand spiritual mysteries—” what is the breadth and length and height and depth.”

The Greek word used in place of the word comprehend is katalambano. It means more than comprehending or understanding.  The Greeks used this word to speak of reaching out to cross the finish line—to win the prize.  Paul is praying that God will strengthen us to enable us to reach out and grasp the prize—to emerge victorious.

  • Verse 18b: “with all the saints”

With Christ rooted in the depths of their being, these Christians join with all the saints—not just those who live nearby, or even those who are still alive. We, today, are joined with all the saints of history when we come to Christ in faith.  We are joined with all the saints of far-away lands—people whose color and culture are different than ours, but who share our faith in Christ. 

  • Verse 18c: “what is the breadth and length and height and depth” 

Having Christ at the center of our lives makes it possible for us to understand “the breadth and length and height and depth”the infinite measure of the One in whom we believe.

  • Verse 19a: “and to know Christ’s love which surpasses knowledge” 

The love that Paul mentions here is Christ’s love for us—not our love for Christ.  He says that Christ’s love surpasses knowledge.  While the Greeks prized knowledge, their knowledge could take them only so far.  For one thing, their knowledge was imperfect.  We have learned so much in the past two thousand years, but our knowledge is also imperfect.  Also, our knowledge, however perfect, cannot bring us into the kingdom of God.  Only Christ’s love has that power.

  • Verse 19b: “that you may be filled with all the fullness of God” 

Paul prays “that Christ may dwell in your hearts through faith; to the end that…you may be filled with all the fullness of God” (vv. 17, 19).  In other words, the Christ who embodied the Godhead (Colossians 2:9) makes it possible for Christians to be “filled with all the fullness of God” (v. 19b)—so that we also embody the Godhead.

TO GOD BE THE GLORY - Read Ephesians 3:20-21 

  • Verse 20: “Now to him who is able to do exceedingly abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that works in us”

Has Paul, in praying for these ordinary Christians to “be filled with all the fullness of God,” asked too much?  Not at all!  God “is able to do exceedingly abundantly above all that we ask or think”—beyond anything our minds can imagine. Earlier, Jesus promised: 

Most certainly I tell you, he who believes in me, the works that I do, he will do also; and he will do greater works than these, because I am going to my Father.  Whatever you will ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.  If you will ask anything in my name, I will do it” (John 14:12-14). 

That too seems too grand to be true—until we consider the meaning of asking in Jesus’ name. 

To pray in Jesus’ name requires that we first try to understand Jesus’ mind so that our prayers represent His will as closely as possible. It is bringing our prayers into accord with the essential character of Jesus. 

When we do that, everything becomes possible. At his ascension, Jesus promised: 

“You will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you. You will be witnesses to me in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the uttermost parts of the earth” (Acts 1:8). 

We, Jesus’ disciples, are His chosen instruments for proclaiming the Gospel.  It makes sense, then, that He would enable us for that task.  The enabling power is the Holy Spirit.

  • Verse 21: “to him be the glory in the assembly and in Christ Jesus to all generations forever and ever. Amen.” 

Paul concludes this chapter with a doxology (an expression of glory to God).  Doxologies of this sort are found frequently in both Old and New Testaments (Psalm 28:6; 31:21; 119:12; Romans 11:36; Galatians 1:5, Philippians 4:20, etc.). Jesus called the church to proclaim the glory of God in perpetuity—” forever and ever.”  That is how it has worked out.  It has been two thousand years since Jesus walked the dusty pathways of Israel, but the church is still giving God glory.  We are not only singing songs of glory in our worship, but we are also proclaiming the Gospel far and wide—and feeding the hungry and healing the sick all over the world in the name of the Christ who has called us.  Who could have imagined such a thing?  God could.  Jesus could.  Paul could. 

This study was culled from: https://www.sermonwriter.com/biblical-commentary/ephesians-314-21/

Posted by: Isekhua Evborokhai AT 05:13 pm   |  Permalink   |  Email
Thursday, February 07 2019

Contributor: Leye Olayiwola

Introduction:

Continuing from Paul’s letter to the saints at Ephesus in Chapter 2, we dug deep into the topic of Grace. We considered what our lives was like before the arrival of Grace and Salvation. We also considered the biblical definition of Grace. We were reminded that “Our faith was not the means by which we received grace. Instead, grace was the means by which we received faith”. We will continue in our study today by looking into God’s pre-ordained plan for the salvation of the Gentiles. 

Verses 1 – 4: A Mystery Is Revealed
"For this reason I, Paul, the prisoner of Christ Jesus for you Gentiles— 2 if indeed you have heard of the dispensation of the grace of God which was given to me for you, 3 how that by revelation He made known to me the mystery (as I have briefly written already, 4 by which, when you read, you may understand my knowledge in the mystery of Christ),"

Paul is given a revelation which he shares with the Ephesians, so that they may have the same enlightenment that was granted him.

Paul is a Genuine Messenger of Christ
Paul spent a lot of time in prisons because of his activities as a Christian preacher. So he calls himself “the prisoner of Christ”. His willingness to suffer deprivations shows the genuineness of his heart. It is therefore not a sin or strange to face some levels of persecutions as faithful follower of Christ. We should also be proud to share our testimonies in order to encourage others. But his message is also genuine —having been given him as a revelation from God. Paul, several times in his writings, mentions that he had no input into his message: God put it into him! It had been a mystery to Paul, but God graciously gave Paul complete understanding by revelation. For example, Paul says to the Galatians, "Brethren, I make known to you that the gospel I preached is not according to man. I did not receive it from man. I was not taught it by man. I received it by revelation of Jesus Christ" (Galatians 1:11-12). Incidentally, Paul uses the word “man” here to denote mere humans as opposed to the divine Son of God.

How the World is Able to Understand
God did not give revelation to everyone, only to a few like Paul. The mystery was "revealed by the Spirit to God’s holy apostles and prophets" (Ephesians 3:5). Everyone else can understand the mystery by hearing those who were given revelation. Paul says, "By revelation the mystery was made known to me... By reading my letters you will understand the mystery of Christ as I do" (Ephesians 3:3-4). Many people today love to say, “God spoke to me and he told me...” It isn't popular any more to say, "The scriptures tell us..."

Verses 5 – 7: The Three Marvels In The Mystery
"which in other ages was not made known to the sons of men, as it has now been revealed by the Spirit to His holy apostles and prophets: 6 that the Gentiles should be fellow heirs, of the same body, and partakers of His promise in Christ through the gospel, 7 of which I became a minister according to the gift of the grace of God given to me by the effective working of His power."

Paul claims that the gospel he preaches makes known the mystery as never before. His gospel embraces the heathen nations and offers them full unity and fellowship with God’s holy people.

The Mystery of Unity
The Gentiles, as Paul has already said, "were without Christ, being aliens from the commonwealth of Israel and strangers from the covenants of promise... Now therefore you are no longer strangers and foreigners, but fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God" (Ephesians 2:12,19 NKJV).

In Paul’s understanding this was the great eye-opener. What Christ did favoured Jews and Gentiles equally and "made both one and broke down the barrier between" (Ephesians 2:14). So now Paul mentions three marvels. Gentiles are "heirs jointly with Israel; members together of a united body; and sharers together of God’s promise in Christ Jesus." (Ephesians 3:6).
•    First, looking to the future hope, Gentile believers are joint heirs with Jewish believers.
•    Second looking to the present, Gentiles and Jews are united in one joint body, one “church”.
•    Third, looking to the past, Gentiles share equally with Jews in the promise made to Abraham that "In your seed all nations of the earth shall be blessed" (Genesis 22:18 cf Galatians 3:16).

Verses 8 - 9: Paul Reflects On His Task
"To me, who am less than the least of all the saints, this grace was given, that I should preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ, 9 and to make all see what is the fellowship of the mystery, which from the beginning of the ages has been hidden in God who created all things through Jesus Christ;"

Paul is conscious of the burden laid on him to get the gospel out among the nations. 

Paul’s Humility
Paul was given the task of taking the gospel to the wider world. He was at the forefront of this campaign. Paul is amazed at God’s grace in choosing him, of all people, for this work. When Paul calls himself “less than the least” he isn't referring to his ability or his desire for the work. He is referring to his worthiness to be chosen. He had been a chief activist in the persecution of the Christian Way. Christ stopped Paul dead in his tracks. Christ appointed him to the opposite task, to be a chief activist in spreading Christ’s message to all nations. Paul marvelled at this grace.

Paul’s Commitment
Paul could see the terrible darkness in the world. Humanity stumbled in ignorance, spiritually destitute. Paul had been given a great light and “boundless riches” to share. He was totally dedicated to that end.

Paul’s Power
Paul was granted the power to achieve his commission. It was not himself that accomplished it, but God working in him and giving him the revelation, the answer to the mystery, the answer the whole world needed. It was now in Paul’s power to help everyone share in the mystery of Christ.

Verses 10- 13: God’s Plan Is Being Fulfilled
"to the intent that now the manifold wisdom of God might be made known by the church to the principalities and powers in the heavenly places, 11 according to the eternal purpose which He accomplished in Christ Jesus our Lord, 12 in whom we have boldness and access with confidence through faith in Him. 13 Therefore I ask that you do not lose heart at my tribulations for you, which is your glory."

Paul was always conscious that he was carrying out God’s Plan. God purposed to make his wisdom known. And of course God’s wisdom would be a mystery unless he made it known.


Wisdom, Purpose, Confidence
God’s “wisdom” was glimpsed by the prophets of old. But now through Jesus Christ the veil of mystery is removed and the good message is revealed. The wisdom of God for salvation is fully known!

God’s “purpose” is achieved through Jesus Christ. Without him, there would not even have been any mystery in which to find hope. However, Jesus tasks all those he calls into his one body of holy people. He gives them all the great commission, "Go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them... teaching them..." (Matthew 28:18-20).
Our “confidence” is in Christ, not in ourselves. We come boldly to God “in Christ” We are confident “in his faith”. It is now an open secret that life is not about believing in yourself. It's about believing in Jesus Christ.

Study culled from https://www.simplybible.com/f74e-eph-the-mystery-of-christ.htm
 

Posted by: Isekhua Evborokhai AT 04:52 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
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